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Tooth and Claw

This book by Jo Walton is a Victorian novel set on a world where the biology actually supports the assumptions about gender roles embodied in the Victorian novel. The characters are all dragons, and dragons have a sexual dimorphism such that females have hands and males have claws.

Walton acknowledges that she took the plot from Anthony Trollope's Framley Parsonage. In both books, the plot is a bit contrived -- the antagonist goes on fighting the protagonist until the right number of pages has happened, and then gives in. This makes the 300 page twentyfirst century book more readable than the 400 page nineteenth century one, but they both describe societies pretty alien to the modern reader.

If you enjoy both nineteenth century novels and world-building science fiction, you will love this book. The electronic version is on sale for $2.99 for a limited time.

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